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Home :: Skin Disorders

Tinea Cruris - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

 

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Tinea Cruris
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Tinea cruris is commonly known as jock itch or ringworm of the groin. Tinea cruris is caused by a fungus infection of the skin. The fungus grows best in warm moist places, and it has a tendency to get worse during the summer because sweating is increased. The fungus causing tinea cruris prefers moist, warm skin; this is why tinea cruris favors the groin area and is often worse in hot weather. The condition is more common in men than in women. The fungi love warm, moist places, and they are often a problem for people with active lifestyles, or those who do not look after their personal hygiene carefully enough. The infection is contagious and can be spread by direct contact. It can also be passed indirectly from person to person, via damp towels for instance. It often affects men who wear tight underwear or improperly washed athletic supporters. Normally tinea cruris does not develop around the scrotum and basically stays in the upper thigh area and creases in the groin area.

Tinea cruris is not a severe disease but may last a long time. It is basically a skin disease typical to youth, but it may occur to the people at any age. Tinea cruris can be very itchy. Tinea cruris can spread to the anus and cause severe itching and discomfort. Some of the fungi involved in these conditions primarily infect animals, but they may also be transmitted from animals to humans. Cats may have an infection, but may not be suspected until lesions appear on their owners. Severe infections, frequently recurring infections, or infections lasting longer than two weeks may require further treatment by your doctor. Stronger prescription medications, such as those containing ketoconazole or terbinafine, or oral antifungals may be needed. Antibiotics may be needed to treat bacterial infections that occur in addition to the fungus. People with weakened immune systems, including those with diabetes and HIV may find it more difficult to rid themselves of the condition.

Causes of Tinea cruris

Tinea infections result from several different fungi. The condition is more common in men than in women. The fungi love warm, moist places, and they are often a problem for people with active lifestyles, or those who do not look after their personal hygiene carefully enough. The conditions fungi like best are warm, moist and airless areas of skin such as the groin. The infection is contagious and can be spread by direct contact. It can also be passed indirectly from person to person, via damp towels for instance.

Common causes and risk factors of Tinea cruris:

  • Formation of eczema.
  • Chemical irritation.
  • Infrequent showering.
  • Using public showers or locker rooms.
  • A weak immune system.

Signs and Symptoms of Tinea cruris

The infection often takes the form of a fairly large, scaly, red-brown patch on the groin. It is more common in men, and the scrotum may also be itchy. A red rash then develops in the groin, usually with a definite edge or border. Both groins are commonly affected. The rash often spreads a short way down the inside of both thighs.

Sign and symptoms may include the following:

  • Red, raised, scaly patches.
  • Burning sensation in the infected area.
  • Itching in groin.
  • Abnormally dark or light skin.

Treatment for Tinea cruris

Severe infections, frequently recurring infections, or infections lasting longer than two weeks may require further treatment by your doctor. An anti-fungal medicine taken by mouth is sometimes prescribed if the rash does not clear with a cream, or if the rash is in many places on the skin in addition to the groin. Treatment is continued for a while after the rash has gone, to minimise the risk of recurrence.Sometimes, oral antifungal medication may be required if the condition is severe. Medications may include griseofulvin, itraconazole, terbinafine and fluconazole.

Treatment may include:

  • An anti-fungal medicine taken by mouth is sometimes prescribed if the rash does not clear with a cream.
  • Wear Cotton Underwear to avoid this disease.
  • Use drying powders and products that reduce sweating. Powders are good for using during the day, since they absorb moisture.
  • Washing the affected area with antibacterial soap will help in killing the fungus.