Health Disease
Neurology Disorders | Cardiology Disorders | Respiratory Diseases | Blood Disorders | Eye Diseases | Endocrine Disorders | Reproductive Disease | Urinary Disorders | Digestive Disorders | Infectious Diseases | Skin Disorders | Immune Disorders | Home Remedies | Herbal Medicines | Drugs & Medicines | First Aid | Plastic Surgery | Depression | Yoga Health | Hair Loss

Home :: Skin Disorders

Pseudofolliculitis Barbae - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

 

Acanthosis Nigricans
Acne Scars
Acne
Acrochordons
Acrodermatitis Continua
Actinic Keratosis
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Alopecia Areata
Amoebiasis
Anal Warts
Androgenic Alopecia
Angioma
Aphthous Ulcer
Athlete's Foot
Atopic Dermatitis
Atypical Moles
Baldness
Blackheads
Blue Nevi
Boils
Bowens Disease
Bullous Pemphigoid
Capillary Hemangioma
Cavernous Hemangioma
Cellulitis
Chapped Lips
Chilblains
Common Warts
Cracked Heels
Dandruff
Dark Circles
Dermatitis Herpetiformis
Dermatitis
Dermatofibroma
Dry Lips
Dyshidrotic Eczema
Dysplastic Nevi
Eczema
Epidermolysis Bullosa
Erythroderma
Facial Rashes
Flexural Psoriasis
Folliculitis
Fordyce's Condition
Freckles
Furunculosis
Genetal Wart
Genital Herpes
Granuloma Annulare
Guttate Psoriasis
Halo Nevus
Hand Dermatitis
Heat Rash
Herpes Simplex
Herpes Zoster
Hidradenitis Suppurativa
Leucoderma
Lyme
Lymphomatoid Papulosis
Mastocytosis
Melasma
Morton's Neuroma
Mucocutaneous Candidiasis
Mycosis Fungoides
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum
Paget's Ddisease
Pemphigus Vulgaris
Perioral Dermatitis
Periorbital Cellulitis
Pimples
Pityriasis Alba
Pityriasis Lichenoides Chronica
Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
Pityrosporum Folliculitis
Plantars Wart
Poison Ivy
Pompholyx
Porphyria Cutanea Tarda
Pruritis
Pruritus Ani
Pseudofolliculitis Barbae
Puffy Eyes
Pustular Psoriasis
Rosacea
Sarcoidosis
Scabies
Sebaceous Cyst
Sebaceous Hyperplasia
Seborrheic Keratoses
Shingles
Skin Abscess
Skin Cancer
Skin Darkening
Skin Infection
Skin Tags
Strawberry Hemangioma
Sunburn Treatment
Telogen Effluvium
Tinea Capitis
Tinea Corporis
Tinea Cruris
Tinea Infection
Tinea Versicolor

Pseudofolliculitis barbae is the medical term for razor bumps. It is a foreign-body inflammatory reaction surrounding ingrown facial hair, which results from shaving. The problem occurs more commonly in people who have curly hair. This condition is called "pseudo" folliculitis because it is caused not by a bacterial infection, but by the regrowth of hair after it has been shaved. It is most common on the male face, but it can also happen on other parts of the body where hair is shaved or plucked, especially areas where hair is curly and the skin is sensitive, such as genital shaving. The cause of this is very simple. Blade shaving sharpens the ends of the hairs like a spear. The hairs then curve back into the skin and cause Pseudofolliculitis barbae.  In some cases, the trauma can be so severe as to result in scar or keloid formation. For a long-term solution to pseudofolliculitis barbae, laser hair removal may be the best option.

This condition occurs most often in people with very curly, kinky hair. For most cases, totally avoid shaving for 3 to 4 weeks until all lesions have subsided, while applying a mild prescription cortisone cream to the involved skin each morning. Shaving every other day, rather than daily, will improve pseudo-folliculitis barbae. Electrolysis and laser hair removal should be considered when all else fails. Use of an electric shaver may also help the condition because it does not cut as close as blades do. Use the electric razor on high setting to avoid close shaving and prepare beard with electric razor pre-shave. Medications are also prescribed to speed healing of the skin. Left untreated, this can develop into acne keloidalis nuchae, a condition where hard, dark keloid -like bumps form on the neck.

Causes of Pseudofolliculitis barbae

The cause of this is very simple. Blade shaving sharpens the ends of the hairs like a spear. The hairs then curve back into the skin and cause Pseudofolliculitis barbae. Women of color who tweeze or pluck their facial hair will find that the hair breaks below the surface of the skin, pierces the hair follicle and then produces the same inflammatory response and bumps. In some cases of folliculitis, the damaged hair follicles become infected with the bacteria Staphylococcus.

Common causes and risk factors of Pseudofolliculitis barbae:

  • Blade shaving.
  • Disorder such as Dermatitis.
  • Use of Plastic dressings or adhesive tape.
  • Some medications or viruses.
  • Excess perspiration.

Signs and Symptoms of Pseudofolliculitis barbae

Pseudofolliculitis barbae predominantly affects black men. It is most noticeable around the beard and neck. Generally, this condition describes the ingrowth of emerged facial hairs back into the skin at a location currently adjacent to the follicle from which the hair has emerged. This penetration back into the skin causes an antigenic foreign body reaction at the point of re-penetration, resulting in lesions consisting of firm papules and pustules in which the ingrown hair can become buried.

Sign and symptoms may include the following :

  • Skin becomes red.
  • Pimples or pustules located around a hair follicle.
  • Rash.
  • Itchy skin.

Treatment for Pseudofolliculitis barbae

For most cases, totally avoid shaving for three to four weeks until all lesions have subsided, while applying a mild prescription cortisone cream to the involved skin each morning. Use of an electric shaver may also help the condition because it does not cut as close as blades do. Use the electric razor on high setting to avoid close shaving and prepare beard with electric razor pre-shave. Hot moist compresses may promote drainage of extensive folliculitis. Your doctor may also prescribe topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, and antifungal medications.

Treatment may include:

  • Use a polyester skin-cleansing pad twice a day.
  • A moisturizing shaving foam can be used to make the condition better.
  • Lotion containing glycolic acid can also be applied to the affected areas.
  • Topical antibiotics such as Bactroban, oral antibiotics e.g., dicloxacillin, or antifungal medications are generally taken to control the infection.
  • Retin-A or a topical antibiotic solution prescribed by your doctor can help the problem.
  • Laser hair removal may also be helpfull.