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Angioma - Definition, Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

 

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Angioma is a benign skin growth that appears as a small, smooth, cherry-red bump. They usually appear at or near the surface of the skin. Angiomas may appear anywhere on the body, and aren't considered dangerous. However, they may be present as symptoms of another more serious disorder, such as cirrhosis. Two angioma types are known: Spider Angioma and Cherry Angioma . Cherry angiomas are the most common vascular lesions to appear on human skin. They are made up of clusters of dilated capillaries on the surface of the skin, which accounts for the cherry-red or purple color. A cherry angioma is painless and harmless, but many persons want them removed for cosmetic reasons. Large angiomas can bleed profusely when they are injured. Angiomas are benign, fairly common skin growths that vary in size. They can occur almost anywhere on the body but usually develop on the trunk. They are common and benign, present in around 10-15% of healthy adults and young children.

The cause of most types of angiomas is not known. Angiomas are more common in childhood and during pregnancy, and a few can appear on anyone. The symptoms associated with angioma include birthmarks as many of them are actually angiomas, stork bites which is a common type of strawberry birthmark, portwine stains which are also referred to as nevus flammeus and strawberry marks which are caused by capillary hemangiomas. Angioma is painless and harmless, but many persons want them removed for cosmetic reasons. Large angiomas can bleed profusely when they are injured. Because of this, don't puncture them or try to remove them yourself. When present in large numbers, the may warn of liver damage. Angiomas generally do not need to be treated. If they are cosmetically displeasing or prone to bleeding, angiomas may be removed by surgery, freezing, burning, or laser.

Causes of Angioma

The cause is unknown. Although painless and harmless, cherry angiomas may bleed profusely if injured. Angiomas are due to aging and do not have any known significance. Spider angiomas are more common in childhood and during pregnancy, and a few can appear on anyone. A spider angioma can be seen in a healthy person without any apparent cause. But it is more common in individuals with liver disease or altered hormone levels. A spider angioma is formed when a group of blood vessels dilates in a characteristic "spider leg" pattern.

Common causes and risk factors of Angioma:

  • Pregnancy.
  • Alcoholic liver disease.
  • Cirrhosis of the liver.

Signs and Symptoms of Angioma

Sign and symptoms may include the following :

  • Birthmarks.
  • Focal neurological deficits.
  • Portwine stains.
  • Seizures.

Treatment for Angioma

Angiomas generally do not need to be treated. In women taking oral contraceptives, they may resolve after stopping these contraceptives. Angiomas associated with liver disease may resolve when liver function increases or when a liver transplant is performed. For spider angiomas on the face, techniques such as electrodesiccation and laser treatment can be used to remove the lesion. There is a small risk of a scar, although the results are generally good. Laser uses a beam of concentrated light. Angiomas sometimes recur after treatment.

Treatment may include:

  • Angiomas can be treated with electrodesiccation were electric needle is used for touching the skin and destroying the blood vessels that make up the tumor.
  • Liquid nitrogen therapy is also used for treating angiomas.
  • Cherry angiomas generally do not need to be treated. If they are cosmetically displeasing or prone to bleeding, angiomas may be removed by surgery.