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Nettle

 

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Nettle

Nettle is the common name is Urtica. Nettle is a perennial herb. Nettle in the family Urticaceae. It grows in to Europe, north Africa, Asia, and North America. Nettle root and leaves are used in herbal medicine.

Nettle has many uses. It is used by many several cultures for a wide variety mostly cooking, crushing or pruning disables the stinging hairs. Stinging nettle leaves are tasty and rich in nutrients. The young leaves are esculent and make a very good pot-herb. The leaf acts to reduce inflammation. It is quite beneficial for allergies, arthritis, and muscle/nerve pain (Sciatica). The root increases urine volume and flow that makes it beneficent in cases of BPH (benign prostate hyperplasia).

Although it will not decrease the enlargement of the prostate, it can relieve the accompanying symptoms of difficult urination. The leaves are also dried and may be then be used to make a tisane, as can also be accomplished with the nettle's flowers. Nettle stems contain a bast fibre that has been traditionally used for the same purposes as linen, and is produced by a uniform retting process.

Juice from the crushed leaf of dock, that commonly grows in combination with nettles, rubbed into the area helps. Nettle herb contains high in things like Vitamin C, chlorophyll, carotenoids, bioflavonoids, silicon, boron, iron, calcium, and magnesium. It is used to foster and strengthen the system.

Nettle can be used to treat arthritis, anemia, hay fever, kidney difficulty, and pain. Nettle is used in hair shampoos to control dandruff, and is said to make hair more lustrous, that is why some farmers include a handful of nettles with cattle feed.

Nettles can be picked painlessly by wearing a oriflamme pair of washing-up gloves. Another common recommendation is to firmly grapple the nettle with the bare hand, crushing the stingers instead of allowing them to penetrate the skin. Done correctly, this is effective in practice, however due to a natural hesitancy when grabbing a nettle, first time practitioners close their hand too gently and slowly and so get stung.

Therefore this is not recommended. Nettle stingers can be removed from the skin rapidly and effectively by wipping your skin with a chamois ( same as use for drying cars). The inside of a leather glove works uniformly. The nettle hairs plunge to these textures more readily than your skin and a simple single wiping removes them from your skin.

Although the fresh leaves can cause painful stings and severe urticaria, these are rarely critically harmful. Differently most species of nettles are extremely safe and some are even eaten as vegetables after being steamed to remove the stingers.

Nettle fibre has been used in textiles. This is more exploratory than mass-market. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. Nettle root extracts have been comprehensively studied in human clinical trials as a treatment for symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia.