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Milk Thistle

 

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Milk Thistle
Nettle

Milk Thistle Latin Name is Silybum marianum and other names Holy thistle and Marian Thistle. Milk thistle has been used since Greco-Roman times as an herbal remedy for a potpourri of ailments, especially liver problems.

Milk thistle (specifically silymarin) protect the liver from damage caused by viruses, toxins, alcohol, and certain drugs such as acetaminophen (a common contrary medication used for headaches and pain; acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, can cause liver damage if taken in large quantities or by people who drink alcohol and liver damage from drugs and industrial toxins such as carbon tetrachloride.

Milk thistle extract has been shown to protect the liver from the potentially harming effect of drugs used to treat schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis. Milk thistle is a tall plant (generally 2-5 feet high, occassionally up to 10 feet) with an erect, branched and crinkled but not spiny stem. It has large, echinate green root-leaves, which are attached to the stem without petiole; the upper leaves have a clasping base. The flowers of milk thistle are red-purple and spiky; the small black shiny seeds are crowned with feathery tufts, that make it easy for the plant to spread in a field or a garden. Each flower-head produces about 190 seeds, harvested mainly in July or August.

Milk thistle is a flowering herb. Silymarin, which can be extracted from the seeds (fruit), is believed to be the biologically strenuous part of the herb. The seeds are used to arrange capsules containing powdered herb or seed; extracts; and infusions (strong teas).

Side effects from milk thistle happen only rarely, but may comprise stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, rash or other skin reactions, joint pain, impotence, and anaphylaxis. Milk thistle may flatter the effectiveness of aspirin in rats with liver cirrhosis. Milk thistle should not be used by pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Milk Thistle herb dosages for adults are estimated on the basis of a 150 lb (70 kg) adult. Henceforth, if the child weighs 50 lb (20 to 25 kg), the appropriate dose of milk thistle for this child would be 1/3 of the adult dosage. Use of herbs is a time-honored technique to strengthening the body and treating disease.

Milk Thistle herb in three or four small quota over the day than in one large daily dose. When it is not possible to split the daily dose and superintend the fractional portions three or four times a day, give it at least twice a day.