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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Lavender

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Lavenders commonly name is Lavandula. It grows in Canary Islands, North and East Africa, south Europe and the Mediterranean, Arabia, and India. Lavender is a color which is a light shade of violet.

Lavender has been comprehensively used in herbalism. It is cultivated forms are planted in gardens world-wide, they are sometimes found growing wild, as garden escapees, well outside their natural range. Lavender plant loves our free draining limestone soils.

Lavenders are capaciously grown in gardens. Flower spikes are used for dried flower layout. The aromatic, pale purple flowers and flower buds are used in potpourris. Dried and sealed in pouches, they are placed among stored items of clothing to give a fresh fragrance and as a impediment to moths. The plant is also grown commercially for extraction of lavender oil from the flowers.

Lavender fields starts blooming in June, depending on the area and the seasonal weather. Our photos of lavender fields have been taken from the first of July to mid October. Our photos of the wild Lavender Stochas have been taken as early as mid March.

This oil is used as an antiseptic and for aromatherapy. The leaves and flowers of lavender are used in terrains where the plant is grown as a flavoring in salads, dressings, fruit desserts, jellies, and wines. The plant and oil are used in herbal teas and as a flavoring combined with black teas.

Lavenders flowers and leaves are occassionally used in sachets, miscellanies, and dried bouquets. The plant material is used to perfume linen and scent tobacco. The oil is used in perfumes, toilet water, and cosmetics. Lavender has been thoroughly used in herbalism.

Lavender is a decisively branched short shrub that grows to a height of roughly 60 centimeters. Its wide rootstock bears woody branches with erect, rod-like, leafy, green shoots. A silvery down covers the gray-green narrow leaves, that are oblong and ebbed, attached directly at the base, and curled spirally.

The plants are grown as ornamentals along garden borders, in rock gardens, and as potted outdoor plants. The plants are also grown near highways for beautification and equalization of soil. Lavender plants are attractive to bees. As a medicinal plant, the lavenders have traditionally been deemed antispasmodics, carminatives, diuretics, nervines, stimulants, and tonics.

Lavender is of positively easy culture in almost any friable, garden soil. It grows abundantly on light soil - sand or gravel - in a dry, open and sunny position. Loam over chalk also appropriates it. It requires good drainage and manumission from damp in winter. Flowers and leaf-stalks can be dried for perfuming bed-linen and to keep moths away from your clothes. Lavender essence is used commercially in the perfume, soap and medicament industries.