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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Kava Kava

 

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Kava Kava Latin Names is Piper methysticum. Other names for kava include Hawaii. Kava kava is from the pepper family. Kava kava is a orthodox herb for preparing beverage, known and used by the inhabitants of the Pacific islands since ancient times. People in other parts of the world got apprised with this herb long time ago as well, still, we know very little about the power and effect of this mysterious plant. The word kava is used to refer both to the plant and the beverage produced from it.

Kava is prepared and consumed in a polymorphism of ways throughout the Pacific Ocean cultures of Polynesia, Vanuatu, Melanesia and some parts of Micronesia and Australia. Traditionally kava has been prepared by either chewing, granulating or pounding. Chewing the kava consists of chomping it in the mouth, depositing it back into a bowl, mixing with water and then straining it through the cloth-like fiber of a coconut tree.

The root and rhizome (underground stem) of kava are used to prepare beverages, extracts, capsules, tablets, and topical solutions. Kava is used for a potpourri of purposes, medicinal, religious, political, cultural and social throughout the Pacific. These cultures have a great cherish for the plant and place a high importance on it.

Topically (on the skin), kava has been used as a deadening agent. Kava is used chiefly for anxiety, insomnia, and menopausal symptoms. Kava can also be blended with coffee to produce kavajava, the effects of which are said to combine the most pleasant qualities of each.

Kava is used primarily in social gatherings to increase geniality and to relax after a day's work. Kava has also been used to help people fall asleep and combat fatigue, as well as to treat asthma and urinary tract infections. Moderate sinew kava drink is 20-30 minutes, with effects usually lasting for two hours. Effects can be felt up to eight hours after ingestion.

Kava has not been shown to be physically addictive. It has been used unscathedly for over 3,000 years. Kava has been reported to cause liver damage, including hepatitis and liver failure (that can cause death).

Kava has been related with different cases of dystonia (abnormal muscle spasm or involuntary muscle movements). Kava may interact with various drugs, including drugs used for Parkinson's disease. Avoid driving and operating heavy machinery while taking kava as the herb has been reported to cause slumbery. Long-term and/or heavy use of kava may sequel in scaly, yellowed skin.

High doses of kava extracts are supposed to cause muscle relaxation and even paralysis (without loss of consciousness) at very high doses. Kava also has local anesthetic attributes, producing peculiar numbing sensations when held in the mouth. Most people find other medicinal uses for kava kava. It is appealing to note that kava has been shown to help ease anxiety, depression, and to help produce restful sleep.