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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Hyssop

 

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Hyssop also known is hastipippili. The name 'hyssop' can be whiffed back almost unchanged through the Greek hyssopos. Hyssop ( Hyssopus ) is a genus of over 10-12 species of herbaceous or semi-woody plants in the family Lamiaceae. Hyssop plant (Hyssopus officinalis) has been cultivated in Central Europe for a long time. They are aromatic, with pitch branched stems up to 60 cm long covered with fine hairs at the tips. The leaves are parochial oblong, 2-5 cm long. The small blue flowers are borne on the upper part of the branches during summer. Hyssop serves not only as spice but in many countries including Hungary, it is used as a folk medicine against specific respiratory diseases.

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) herb once used to clean antediluvian temples, is now a popular herb during the winter season. Known for its strong mint smell and pretty flowers, it was scatter on floors to deodorize and purify the air. Presently it is used as a popular herbal supplement available in capsules, as a hyssop tea, as aromatic nasal and chest rubs, and as an attractive addition to the herb garden. Hyssop leaves have a little it bitter minty flavour and can be added to soups, salads or meats, though should be used thrifty as the flavour is very strong.

Hyssop also has medicinal properties that are listed as including expectorant, carminative, slackens peripheral blood vessels, promotes sweating, anti-inflammatory, anti-catarrhal, antispasmodic. Its active ingredients are volatile oil, flavonoids, tannins and acerbic substance ( marrubin ). A strong tea made from the leaves and flowering tops is used in lung, nose and throat congestion and catarrhal. Hyssop is used a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Cabbage Moth.

Hyssop is also used as an consitituent in eau de Cologne, and in the liqueur Chartreuse. Hyssop is cultivated for the use of its flower-tops, which are steeped in water to make an infusion, that is occassionally employed as an expectorant. Hyssop also attracts bees, hoverflies and butterflies, therefore has a place in the wild garden as well as being useful in regulating pests and encouraging pollination without the use of unnatural methods.

There are three varieties, known severally by their blue, red and white flowers, that are in bloom from June to October, and are sometimes employed as edging plants Hyssop and its oil are mainly used to treat respiratory problems. The Greek Hippocrates already endorsed hyssop to treat bronchitis. Presently, hyssop is used for the treatment nasal congestion and mild irritations of the respiratory tract. The marrubiin of Hyssop expedites the expectoration of mucus.

The hyssop essential oil has stimulus and antiseptic affects. The essential oil contain pinocamphone and isopinocamphone that have neurotoxic effects. The essential should thus only be taken with care and in much diluted form. Hyssop oil is used as integrant in some French liqueurs. Hyssop can also be used in the kitchen. The hyssop flowers and leaves can be used to sapidity dishes, including soups, salads, sauces, meat dishes, vegetable dishes and fruit salads. Fresh and dried hyssop flowers are also used as adornment.