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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Feverfew

 

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Feverfew, also known as featherfew and bachelor's buttons. It is a traditional medicinal herb that is found in many old gardens. It is also sometimes grown for ornament; the plant grows into a small bush up to around 18 inches high, with citrus-scented leaves and is covered by flowers impressionistic of daisies. It spreads quickly, and they will cover a wide area after a few years.

It is a complex plant growing in every hedgerow, having numerous, small, daisy-like heads of yellow flowers with outer white rays, the central yellow florets being arranged on a nearly flat receptacle, not conical as in the chamomiles. The stem is finely crinkled and hairy, about 2 feet high; the leaves alternate, sericeous with short hairs, or nearly smooth-about 4 1/2 inches long and 2 inches broad - bipinnatifid, with serrate margins, the leaf-stalk being flattened above and convex beneath. It is not to be befuddled with other wild chamomile-like allied species, which mostly have more feathery leaves and somewhat large flowers. The stem also is upstanding, whereas that of the true garden Chamomile is procumbent.

Feverfew herb is bruised and heated and fried with a little wine and oil. Leaves of feverfew and flowers in extract, infusion, and dried in capsules. Feverfew plant has a stalwart and bitter smell, and is particularly disliked by bees.

Feverfew ( Tanacetum parthenium ), a member of the sunflower family, has been used for centuries in European folk medicine as a remedy for headaches, arthritis and fevers. A double salmagundi is cultivated in gardens for ornamental purposes, and its flower-heads are sometimes substituted for the double Chamomile. The term feverfew is reconciled from the Latin word febrifugia or fever reducer.

Feverfew has also been traditionally used to treat menstrual aberrations, labor difficulties, skin conditions, stomach aches, and asthma. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenemium L) is a popular herbal remedy prescribed for the prevention of migraine. It helps prevent the constriction of blood vessels in the brain (one of the leading causes of migraine headaches). Parthenolide also bridles the actions of compounds that cause inflammation.