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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Fenugreek

 

Agrimony
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American Ginseng
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Barberry
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Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
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Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
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Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
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Kudzu
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Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Fenugreek is used an herb (the leaves) and as a spice. Fenugreek is belongs to the parentage of Fabaceae. Fenugreek is a latin world it means "Greek hay. It is cultivated ecumenical as a semi-arid crop. Fenugreek is endemic to the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea. It is grown in India, Morocco, Egypt and England. The herb can grow to be about two feet tall. It blooms white flowers in the summer and has very redolent seeds.

Fenugreek seeds are ground and roasted and used to flavor to curry. The seeds can be used to make tea, that can reduce fever and menstrual pains, or they can be used in an ointment to treat skin infections. The seeds have also been used to upsurge libido in men and serve as an aphrodisiac. Ground seeds are often used to give a maple flavoring to sweets and candies. Ground seeds are also used to flavor cattle food, including various vegetable meals and hays. 

Fenugreek using for diabetes, high cholesterol, inflammatory bowel disease and gastric ulcers. Fenugreek's leaves, that are high in iron, are used in salads. Taken internally, fenugreek is used to treat bronchitis, coughs, respiratory problems, sinus conditions and to increase milk. Use of more than 100 grams of fenugreek seeds daily can cause intestinal distress and nausea (recommended dose is less than 8 grams per day).

Fenugreek has been used to promote lactation and as an aphrodisiac. Fenugreek seeds contain hormone precursors that increase milk supply. It is possible because breasts are modified sweat glands, and fenugreek provokes sweat production. It has been observed that fenugreek can increase a nursing mother's milk supply within 24 to 72 hours after first taking the herb. Once an competent level of milk production is reached, most women can discontinue the fenugreek and maintain the milk supply with adequate breast stimulation. 

Many women presently take fenugreek in a pill form (ground seeds placed in capsules). The pills can be available at most vitamin and nutrition stores and at many supermarkets and natural foods stores. Fenugreek can also be taken in tea form, though tea is believed to be less puissant than the pills and the tea comes with a bitter taste that can be hard to stomach. Fenugreek seeds have been used as an oral insulin pinch-hit, and seed extracts have been reported to lower blood glucose levels in laboratory animals.

Fenugreek has caused enhanced asthma symptoms in some women and has lowered blood glucose levels in some women with diabetes.