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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Elderberry

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
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Coltsfoot
Comfrey
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Dandelion
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Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
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Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
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Nettle

'Elder' comes from the Anglo-Saxon word aeld. Elderberry commoly name is Sambucus. Elderberry ( Sambucus ) is a genus of between 5-30 species of shrubs or small trees. Elderberry is small tree which grows to 12 feet and is native to North America. The European elder (nigra) grows to 30 feet, is present throughout Europe, Asia, North Africa, and has been domesticated in the United States. The tree has been called "the medicine chest of the common people. It flowers, leaves, berries, bark and roots have all been used in traditional folk medicine for centuries.

Common elderberry often grows in abundance, dense stands in moist places. Look for it in marshes, along riverbanks, along roadsides, and in damp woods and thickets in eastern North America and the West Indies. Elderberry is also used jams, jellies, teas, and fruit pies. It can also be found in sherry and brandy. The berries have few calories and plenty of nutrition. They give very large amounts of potassium and beta-carotene, as well as sugar and fruit acids, calcium, phosphorous and vitamin C. Mulberries are idiosyncratic berries that are hard to find in the marketplace because of their fragility. Soft and semi-sweet, the mulberries are more often consumed by people who have a tree in their backyard or know how to recognize them in the wild when fruit picking.

Some types of berries which are easily present include the black current. First is dewberry, that is similar to the blackberry, except smaller; and elderberries, popular in the making of wines and jams. Most unusual berries available in the market are actually man-made crosses created to have faster growth, resilience to harsh weather, or larger size. Second is boysenberry, that was created to be soft in flavor and without seeds; boysenberries are a cross among loganberries, raspberries, and blackberries.

Third is olallieberries are unusual berries which arised from the cross between loganberries and youngberries, itself a man-made berry. Fourth is Gooseberries are another example of unusual berries, with the added feature which American gooseberries are extremely different to European gooseberries in size, flavor (acidic vs. sweet), and format. Seaberries are unusual berries which grow in cold weather and only in a some countries around the world. They are famous in Russia, where they are used to make tea.