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Echinacea

 

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Echinacea, the purple coneflower. Echinacea greek name is echino, meaning "spiny", because of the spiny central disk Echinacea is an herb growth mostly in the United States. It is nine species of flowering plants in the Family Asteraceae. Echinacea is the best known and inquisitioned herb for stimulating the immune system. Diverse species of Echinacea, notably P. purpurea, E. angustifolia, and E. pallida, are grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Some species are used by familial stock for forage; an bounteousness of these plants on rangeland purportedly indicates "good health".

Echinacea angustifolia rhizome was used by North American Plains Indians, perchance more than most other plants, for various herbal remedies. This herb is occassionally used as a natural antibiotic and immune system stimulator, helping to build resistance to colds, flu and infections. It is supposed to increase the production of white blood cells, and improve the lymph glands. The tea from this herb has been used for infections and has been used in treating skin cancers and other cancers.

Echinacea expedites wound healing, lessens symptoms of and speeds recovery from viruses. Anti-inflammatory effects make it useful externally against inflammatory skin conditions including psoriasis and eczema. It may also increase resistance to candida, bronchitis, herpes, and other infectious conditions.

Echinacea plant mostly roots are used fresh or dried to make teas, squeezed (expressed) juice, extracts, or preparations for external use. It has also been used in homeopathy treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, indigestion, gastroenteritis, and weight loss. Some people suffer allergic reactions, including rashes, increased asthma, and anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction).

In medical trials, gastrointestinal side effects were most common. Echinacea aids in the production of interferon has increases anti-viral activity against influenza (flu), herpes, an inflammation of the skin and mouth. It may reduce the austerity of symptoms such as runny nose and sore throat and reduce the duration of illness.

Echinacea has a terrific safety record and is very well tolerated by most people. It has also useful properties as a strong therapeutic and aphrodisiac. As an injection, the extract has been used for haemorrhoids and a tint of the fresh root has been found effective in diphtheria and putrid fevers.