Health Disease
Neurology Disorders | Cardiology Disorders | Respiratory Diseases | Blood Disorders | Eye Diseases | Endocrine Disorders | Reproductive Disease | Urinary Disorders | Digestive Disorders | Infectious Diseases | Skin Disorders | Immune Disorders | Home Remedies | Herbal Medicines | Drugs & Medicines | First Aid | Plastic Surgery | Depression | Yoga Health | Hair Loss

Home :: Herbal Medicines

Dill

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Dill Latin Name is Anethum graveolens.It is a short-lived annual herb It is growth in southwest and central Asia. It is the lone species of the genus Anethum, though classified by some botanists in the related genus Peucedanum.

Dill grows to 40-60 cm tall, with slight stems and alternate, exquisitely divided, softly delicate leaves 10-20 cm long. The primitive leaf divisions are 1-2 mm broad, slightly broader than the similar leaves of fennel , which are threadlike, less than 1 mm broad, but harder in texture. The flowers are white to yellow, in small umbels 2-9 cm diameter. The seeds are 4-5 mm long and 1 mm thick, and straight to a bit curved with a longitudinally ridged surface. Dill seed are used as a spice, and its fresh leaves. Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called "dill weed" to discernible it from dill seed) are used as herbs.

Dill is an herb effectual for the treatment of colic, gas, and indigestion. People were clipping dill as far back as the ancient Greeks, who regarded dill to be a sign of wealth. They even exhibited their wealth by burning dill scented oil. Hippocrates had a recipe for cleaning the mouth: "Clean teeth with ball of Wool dipped in Hone {honey}, rense with 1 tsp. of dill seed boiled in 1/2 cup of white wine. In the middle ages, dill was used as an integrant in love potions, and also as a protection against evil and witchcraft. Dill seeds contain a whimsical oil that has a relaxant effect on muscles, especially those of the digestive tract, and has been used for centuries to cure such problems.

Dill will grow well in most soils. Dill will also grow indoors - sow the seeds indoors during October in 7cm (3in) pots. Dill is indulgent of most conditions and easy to germinate. Container grown or in the garden it is also a very flattering plant having wispy feathery leaves. Prepare the soil by digging to a spade and a half depth - the long tap roots of dill want to be able to grow without hitting solid soil. Integrate some long lasting fertiliser, such as bonemeal, at the rate of two handfuls per square metre (yard).

It is only hardy down to about -4C, so it is sown from seed each year. Sow thinly in April, covering with only a fine layer of soil. The seedlings will originate in two weeks or so, and should be thinned to 24cm (9in) apart. Additional sowings can be made during the spring and early summer to extend the harvest time. The long tapered roots of dill will ensure that it is improbably to need watering in all but the most extreme dry conditions. For growing outside, use normal potting compost and keep the plants well watered.