Health Disease
Neurology Disorders | Cardiology Disorders | Respiratory Diseases | Blood Disorders | Eye Diseases | Endocrine Disorders | Reproductive Disease | Urinary Disorders | Digestive Disorders | Infectious Diseases | Skin Disorders | Immune Disorders | Home Remedies | Herbal Medicines | Drugs & Medicines | First Aid | Plastic Surgery | Depression | Yoga Health | Hair Loss

Home :: Herbal Medicines

Coltsfoot

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Coltsfoot scintific name is Tussilago farfara. Tussilago means "cough suppressant. Other common names comprise Ass's foot, Bull's foot, Butterbur, Coughwort, Farfara, Foal's foot, Foalswort, Horse Foot and Winter heliotrope. It has been used medicative as a cough suppressant .Coltsfoot is a plant in the family Asteraceae. The plant is often underpinned in waste and disturbed places and along roadsides and paths.

In some areas it is regarded an invasive species. Coltsfoot grows copiously throughout England, especially along the sides of railway banks and in waste places, on poor stiff soils, growing as well in wet ground as in dry situations. It has long-stalked, hoof-shaped leaves, about 4 inches across, with lanky teeth on the margins. Coltsfoot is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including The Gothic and Small Angle Shades .

The Coltsfoot is also worked by the honey bee (apis mellifera mellifera), this species provided a plenty of pollen for the honey bee. Coltsfoot root is spreading, small and white, and has also been used medicinally. Coltsfoot leaves, collected in June and early part of July, and, to a slender extent, the flower-stalks collected in February. All parts of the plant pullulate in mucilage, and contain a little tannin and a trace of a bitter amorphous glucoside. The flowers contain also a phytosterol and a dihydride alcohol, Faradial.

Coltsfoot tea is also made for the same intend, and Coltsfoot Rock has long been a domestic nostrum for coughs. Tussilago is a mild diuretic and has been used in cystitis. It contains perceptible levels of zinc which may be responsible for the herb's anti-inflammatory and healing properties; the fresh, bruised leaves can be applied to boils, abscesses and ulcers while compresses made from the fresh leaves may help to relieve joint pain.

Antibacterial activity has been accounted against various Gram-negative bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus hauseri, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Tussilago farfara is well adapted to poor, wet soils and can be found along roads, in pastures, in open forests and along rivers. Although the plant can tolerate full sun, it thrives in prejudiced shade. Tussilago farfara can form large colonies due to its rhizomes. The colonies can coterie out native species. These rhizomes can go as deep as 3 m (almost 10 ft.) making it complicate to dig out.

Coltsfoot has been used since at least diachronical times to treat lung ailments such as asthma as well as various coughs by way of smoking. Crushed flowers supposedly cured skin conditions, and the plant has been consumed as a food item. It is also a common plant in North America and South America where it has been acquainted, most likely by settlers as a medicinal item.