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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Black Cohosh

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Black cohosh comes from the same plant family as buttercup. It grows in North America and Canada. Black cohosh other common names such as black snakeroot, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot, rattletop, rattleweed, and macrotys. Scientific names for the plant are Actaea racemosa and Cimicifuga racemosa. This perennial woodland plant likes the intent shade of moist hillsides, the home of other important medicinal plans such as goldenseal and ginseng. It has sinewy, three-divided leaves, with three-lobed terminal leaflets. The medial lobe of the sharply-toothed leaflets is the largest. The plant is little-observed until it sends up its tall spikes of showy white flowers, three to eight feet tall. Petals are not to be noticed; the chief feature is tufts of conspicuous stamens surrounding the pistil in the middle.

In begins blossoming in May in the southern part of its range, persisting to flower into September in more northerly regions. The root is the part of the plant used in herbal traditions. Most of the root is wild-harvested, while some is grown commercially in Europe. The genus Cimicifuga comprises eighteen species. They are commonly known as bugbanes, primarily referring to the single native European species. The genus name Cimicifuga , itself, honors this olfactory scrutiny. It derives from the Latin cimex meaning bug (particularly the bed bug Cimex lectularius ) and fugare "to drive-away" in reference to the insect-repelling pecularities. These species are also known by the names bugwort or bugbane.

They have been used discretely as insect repellents throughout their extensive ranges from India to western Europe to eastern Siberia. The pasturage of the American black cohosh does not possess a strong odor. Black cohosh was a home remedy used for rheumatism and fever, as a diuretic, and to bring on menstruation. It was eminently popular among a group of alternative practitioners who called black cohosh "macrotys" and prescribed it for rheumatism, lung conditions, neurological conditions, and conditions that affected women's reproductive organs (including menstrual problems, inflammation of the uterus or ovaries, infertility, threatened miscarriage, and relief of labor pains).

Black cohosh preparations are used in the treatment of menopause to improve symptoms such as hot flashes, depression and sleep complaints. Black cohosh produced an effect on serum concentrations of pituitary hormone levels, including a significant and discriminating reduction of luteinizing hormone. Hot flashes have been associated to a critical spike in the release of luteinizing hormone.