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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Barberry

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

The Common Barberry, a well-known, bushy shrub, having pale-green deciduous leaves, is found in copses and hedges in some parts of England, although a equivocal native in Scotland and Ireland. Barberries are generally used in the southern landscape as they tolerate extreme soil and climate conditions and require minimum maintenance. The species most often found in South Carolina are wintergreen barberry, Mentor barberry and Japanese barberry first is Wintergreen barberry ( Berberis julianae ) is an evergreen shrub having thorny branches. It grows about 10 feet tall and wide. The thorns and profuse growth habit combine to make this an excellent barrier plant. The leaves are a lucent dark green. They turn bronze or wine-red in the fall and persist so during the winter.

Substantial yellow flowers in spring are followed by bluish-black second is Japanese barberry ( Berberis thunbergii ) is the most popular landscape barberry. Many cultivars are present. It grows from 3 to 6 feet tall and 4 to 7 feet wide, depending on the cultivar. The shrub is medium to very dense with many thorns. The leaves are radiant green in summer, changing to orange, scarlet and reddish purple in the fall. Japanese barberry is deciduous, and it is one of the first shrubs to leaf out in spring. This is true for most of the deciduous barberries. It loses its leaves in winter, but may be semi-evergreen in rabid areas. The dark green, leathery leaves variate orange to red in the fall. The yellow flowers in spring are not as flamboyant as the flowers of other species, but they are still attractive.

Mentor barberry does not produce any fruits. All barberries make superb hedge plants because of their uniform growth rate, and they make excellent barrier plants because of the thorny nature of their stems. They can be used for massing, shrub borders and as foundation plants. Japanese barberry is often used to hold and accouter slopes and banks.

The Barberry used to be cultivated for the sake of the fruit, that was pickled and used for garnishing dishes. The ripe berries can be made into an congenial, refreshing jelly by boiling them with an equal weight of fine sugar to a proper consistence and then straining it. They were aforetime used as a sweetmeat, and in sugar-plums, or comfits. It is from these berries that the appetizing confitures d'epine vinette, for which Rouen is famous, are commonly prepared. Tonic, evacuative, antiseptic. It is used in the form of a liquid extract, given as boil down, infusion or tincture, but generally a salt of the alkaloid Berberine is preferred. As a acerbic stomachic tonic, it proves an excellent remedy for dyspepsia and functional derangement of the liver, regulating the digestive powers, and if given in larger doses, acting as a mild purgative and removing constipation. It is used in all cases of jaundice, general flimsiness and biliousness, and for diarrhoea. Barberry is gettable in capsules, fluid extracts, tinctures, and as a topical ointment.