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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Ashwagandha

 

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Ashwagandha Botanical name is Withania somnifera. Ashwagandha is a herb which is widespread used in Ayurveda, the traditional health care system in India. Ashwagandha is used as a common tonic and "adaptogen", helping the body adapt to stress. Aswagandha is an pitched branched shrub with a greenish or lurid yellow flowers. All parts of the plant are used in herbal medicine. In Ayurveda, the fresh roots are betimes boiled in milk, before to drying, in order to leach out undesirable constituents. The berries are used as a substitute for rennet, to gelatinize milk in cheese making. Aswagandha in India is akin to ginseng in other parts of the orient.

Ashwagandha - also known as Indian Winter Cherry - is a shrub genteeled in India and North America whose roots have been used for thousands of years by Ayurvedic practitioners. Ashwagandha root have flavonoids and many active ingredients of the withanolide class. Different studies over the past few years have looked into if ashwagandha has anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-stress, antioxidant, mind-boosting, immune-enhancing, and reinvigorating properties. Diachronically, ashwagandha root has also been noted to have enhancing properties.

Ashwagandha has been used for fortifying the body and for helping to prevent disease. Ashwagandha has been shown to exhibit antioxidant activity as well as an ability to support a healthy immune system. Ashwagandha may also strengthen immune system function, and scientific studies on animals have shown that white blood cell counts are augmented over baseline levels after ashwagandha administration. It is hypothesized that the sitoindosides in ashwagandha elevates phagocyte action, leading in strong immune system function and the demolition and elimination of pathogens from the body.

Ashwagandha also wields strong antioxidant effects. Oxidants are harmful ions - free-radicals - which can harm organs, muscle tissue, and DNA. By salvaging the body for free radicals and eliminating them, ashwagandha can prevent your body from damage, thereby speeding recovery from exercise. As an energy booster which also exerts a mild sedative effect, ashwagandha halcyons the body and soothes the mind, resulting to a normal reduction in stress and anxiety. Ashwagandha side effects may comprise a slight rise in body temperature after one week of use, and large doses may result in nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.