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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Angelica

 

Agrimony
Alfalfa
American Ginseng
Angelica
Arnica
Asafoetida
Ashwagandha
Asian Ginseng
Astragalus
Barberry
Bee Balm
Bilberry
Black Cohosh
Black Currant and Borage Oil
Boswellia
Capsicum Peppers
Cats Claw
Chamomile
Chaste Tree
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Elderberry
Elecampane
Ephedra
Evening Primrose
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginkgo Bilob
Ginseng
Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate
Goldenseal
Gotu Cola
Guggul
Hyssop
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kudzu
Lavender
Lobelia
Lomatium
Marshmallow
Milk Thistle
Nettle

Angelica may be termed a perdurable herbaceous plant. It is biennial only in the botanical logic of that term. The seedlings make but little further towards maturity within twelve months, whilst old plants die off after seeding once, that occassion may be at a much more remote period than in the second year of growth. Only very progressed seedlings flower in their second year, and the third year of growth commonly completes the full period of life. There is another species, Angelica heterocarpa, a innate of Spain, that is credited as truly perennial; it flowers a few weeks later than the biennial species, and is not so ornamental in its foliage. The flowers, small and numerous, yellowish or greenish in colour, are clustered into large, globular umbels. They bloom in July and are succeeded by pale yellow, oblong fruits, 1/6 to a 1/4 inch in length when full-fledged, with membraneous edges, flattened on one side and convex on the other, which bears three conspicuous ribs. Both the odour and taste of the fruits are pleasantly redolent.

Angelica is widely used in the grocery trade, as well as for medicine, and is a favourite flavouring for confectionery and liqueurs. The regard of its unique flavour was established in ancient times when saccharin stuff was extremely rare. The use of the sweetmeat may probably have spawned from the belief that the plant possessed the power of averting or expelling pestilence.

Angelica has a medicinal herb, in particular for the treatment of digestive disorders and complications with blood circulation. The stems and seeds for use in confectionery and flavouring and the preparation of liqueurs. The dried leaves, on appreciation of their aromatic qualities, are used in the preparedness of hop bitters. The whole plant is aromatic, but the root only is legitimate in the Swiss, Austrian and German Pharmacopoeias.

Angelica roots should be dried quickly and placed in air-tight receptacles. They will then restore their medicinal virtues for many years. The root should be dug up in the autumn of the first year, as it is then least susceptible to become mouldy and worm-eaten: it is very apt to be attacked by insects. Where very thick, the roots should be sliced longitudinally to invigorate the drying process. The fresh root has a yellowish-grey epidermis, and forgoes when bruised a honeycoloured juice, having all the aromatic properties of the plant. If an incision is made in the bark of the stems and the crown of the root at the arrival of spring, this resinous gum will exude. It has a especial aromatic flavour of musk benzoin, for either of that it can be restored. The Angelica species are generally pinpointed as safe for human consumption as natural seasonings/flavorings, and Angelica archangelica.