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Home :: Herbal Medicines

Agrimony

 

Agrimony
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Agrimony Botanical name is Agrimonia Eupatoria. This herb is termed after Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, who was a known herbalist. The plant is found copiously throughout England, on hedge-banks and the sides of fields, in dry thickets and on all waste places. In Scotland it is much more local and does not pierce very far northward.

Agrimony has an old dignity as a popular, domestic medicinal herb, being a simple well known to all country-folk. Mainly Agrimony was used by ancient Greeks who soothed eye problems and Anglo-Saxons who treated wounds with it. It propers to the Rose order of plants, and its scrawny spikes of yellow flowers, which are in bloom from June to early September, and the singularly beautiful form of its much-cut-into leaves, make it one of the most graceful of our smaller herbs.

Agrimonia is a digestive tonic; its  tannins tones the mucous membranes, recuperating their secretion and absorption. It is of particular advantage in the treatment of irritation and infection of the digestive tract in children. It is also of use in peptic ulceration and for regulating colitis. The acerbic principles regulate the liver and gallbladder function, and in Germany it has been used to treat gallstones and cirrhosis of the liver. It is betokened in gallbladder disease associated with gastric hyperacidity.

Rarely Agrimony people turn to drink or drugs to help them maintain a mask of happiness, and they tend not to like being alone since they find it harder to keep the mask up when they are forced into their own company. Instead they will essay out friends, parties and bright lights. Only at night when they are alone with their speculations will the mental torture they have repressed so successfully come back to haunt them.

Agrimony is given to help Agrimony people to tolerate and come to terms with the darker side of life and their own personalities, so that they can become more rounded human beings. They will be as well-liked as they were earlier, for their sensitivity, understanding, and ability to face their issues and genuinely treat them lightly serves as an inspiration to the rest of us. They will not lose their sense of humour, but they will laugh at their troubles to banish them, rather than laughing to hide them. As a mood remedy, Agrimony helps anyone who is trying not to face a obsess and using jokes and wittiness and smiles to avoid a painful reality.