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Febrile convulsions

 

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Febrile convulsions are caused by overheating and are most common in children under two. There is usually a history of fever and illness, such as throat infection, which is often exacerbated by the child being wrapped too warmly in bed. Typically, the child's skin will be flushed and hot, and the convulsion is characterized by arching of the back and violent muscle-twitching. The fists may be clenched and the eyes rolled upwards, and the breath is often held.

Treatment of a Febrile Convulsion is aimed at reducing the Child's Body Temperature.

1. Remove the child's blankets and clothing.

2. Pad around the child with soft pillows to prevent him or her from hunting himself or herself during a convulsion.

3. Sponge the child with a sponge or flannel soaked in tepid water, starting from the head and working downwards.

4. Keep the airway open by placing the child in the recovery position.

5. Call the doctor or emergency service.