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Home :: First Aid

Fainting

 

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Unconsciousness

Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness occasioned by a reduced blood supply to the brain. This may be caused by an emotional shock, fear, pain or inadequate food intake over a period of time.

More usually, however, people faint after long spells of inactivity, particularly in warm, airless conditions, during which blood will tend to pool in the lower part of the body, thereby reducing the amount available to the brain.

Treatment of Fainting

1. Lie the casualty down on the floor and raise the legs above the level of the head.

2. Open the windows and wait for the casualty to regain consciousness - usually within a few minutes.

3. As the casualty recovers, provide spoon and gradually assist to a sitting position. Observe him or her for any injury.

4. If the casualty does not regain consciousness quickly, place him or her in the recovery position check breathing and circulation, and call for an ambulance. Be prepared to resuscitate if necessary